Co-ordinator

Dr. Veronika Krieghoff
Dr. Veronika Krieghoff
Scientific co-ordinator IMPRS NeuroCom

Phone: +49 341 9940-2261
Fax: +49 341 9940-2221

IMPRS NeuroCom

The programme combines opportunities for outstanding research with excellent teaching, in order to ensure that students are highly qualified for a successful career in relevant areas of Neuroscience. Students choose a research topic that falls within the scope of one of the following four modules.

This module focuses on the neural basis of language and communication processing in the human brain. Researchers from the field of psychology, linguistics and neurology provide students with a unique opportunity to investigate auditory cognition as well as speech and language processing from both an experimental and a theoretical perspective. We provide strong methodological support, utilising behavioural and electrophysiological methods (M/EEG) as well as functional and structural neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, fNIRS, DTI). These methods are complemented by state-of-the-art non-invasive brain stimulation approaches. Cutting-edge multivariate tools are used to provide insight into neural dynamics, activity and functional as well as structural interactions. Leading researchers of the respective fields are regularly invited to Leipzig to present and discuss their work. The teaching part of this module covers courses on hearing, psycholinguistics, the neural basis of language comprehension and production, emotional speech comprehension, linguistic topology, and understanding typological distribution.

Module I
Language and Communication

This module focuses on the neural basis of language and communication processing in the human brain. Researchers from the field of psychology, linguistics and neurology provide students with a unique opportunity to investigate auditory cognition as well as speech and language processing from both an experimental and a theoretical perspective. We provide strong methodological support, utilising behavioural and electrophysiological methods (M/EEG) as well as functional and structural neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, fNIRS, DTI). These methods are complemented by state-of-the-art non-invasive brain stimulation approaches. Cutting-edge multivariate tools are used to provide insight into neural dynamics, activity and functional as well as structural interactions. Leading researchers of the respective fields are regularly invited to Leipzig to present and discuss their work. The teaching part of this module covers courses on hearing, psycholinguistics, the neural basis of language comprehension and production, emotional speech comprehension, linguistic topology, and understanding typological distribution.

This module teaches the scientific basis of psychology, social and affective neuroscience. The areas of scientific enquiry covered in this module include psychology, social cognition, empathy, self-other discrimination, plasticity of “Theory of Mind”, and the brain’s default network. Another important aspect of this module is the analysis of the causes underlying psychopathologies of social cognition, early child development and culture, and the investigation of memory processes that allow us to function in the future.

Module II
Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

This module teaches the scientific basis of psychology, social and affective neuroscience. The areas of scientific enquiry covered in this module include psychology, social cognition, empathy, self-other discrimination, plasticity of “Theory of Mind”, and the brain’s default network. Another important aspect of this module is the analysis of the causes underlying psychopathologies of social cognition, early child development and culture, and the investigation of memory processes that allow us to function in the future.

In this module, students are taught how innovative questions can be asked and how state-of-the-art techniques can be used in the attempt to understand the brain both in its normal and diseased state. The “classical” anatomical way to study the brain’s microstructure by cutting and staining postmortem brains is becoming increasingly complemented by non-invasive neuroimaging techniques used in vivo. Current research draws on powerful techniques such as functional and structural MRI, EEG, MEG, and NIRS. The teaching part of this module covers the foundations of Neuroscience, sensory and motor systems, brain and behaviour, and psychiatric and neurological disorders of the brain.

Module III
Basic and Clinical Neuroscience

In this module, students are taught how innovative questions can be asked and how state-of-the-art techniques can be used in the attempt to understand the brain both in its normal and diseased state. The “classical” anatomical way to study the brain’s microstructure by cutting and staining postmortem brains is becoming increasingly complemented by non-invasive neuroimaging techniques used in vivo. Current research draws on powerful techniques such as functional and structural MRI, EEG, MEG, and NIRS. The teaching part of this module covers the foundations of Neuroscience, sensory and motor systems, brain and behaviour, and psychiatric and neurological disorders of the brain.
This module comprises two topics: (i) The physical principles of modern neuroimaging techniques, biophysical tissue properties that are exploited for generating image contrast, as well as signal processing strategies involved. In addition to state-of-the-art imaging technology including a 7T whole-body MRI scanner and a 306-channel MEG system, well-equipped electronics and radio-frequency workshops are available for methods-oriented research projects. (ii) Signal processing, which includes topics such as image analysis and visualization concepts, statistical evaluation, morphometry and connectivity analyses, spatio-temporal modelling, cognitive modelling and theoretical models of brain function.
Fundamental knowledge covering all four modules is imparted during the first two years in the form of lectures, courses, and seminars run at the MPIs and the UL. This provides a comprehensive foundation for students’ research in Neuroscience, and opens up horizons for potential interdisciplinary approaches.

Module IV
Neuroimaging Physics and Signal Processing

This module comprises two topics:
(i) The physical principles of modern neuroimaging techniques, biophysical tissue properties that are exploited for generating image contrast, as well as signal processing strategies involved. In addition to state-of-the-art imaging technology including a 7T whole-body MRI scanner and a 306-channel MEG system, well-equipped electronics and radio-frequency workshops are available for methods-oriented research projects.
(ii) Signal processing, which includes topics such as image analysis and visualization concepts, statistical evaluation, morphometry and connectivity analyses, spatio-temporal modelling, cognitive modelling and theoretical models of brain function.

Fundamental knowledge covering all four modules is imparted during the first two years in the form of lectures, courses, and seminars run at the MPIs and the UL. This provides a comprehensive foundation for students’ research in Neuroscience, and opens up horizons for potential interdisciplinary approaches.

 
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