IMPRS NeuroCom Summer School 2018

Programme


TUESDAY, 26 June

08:30-09:15

Registration

09:15-09:30

Opening Remarks

Session 1: Tools and Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience: State of the art, recent advances, and future prospects, Part I

Chair: Arno Villringer

09:30 10:00

Arno Villringer

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

The role of different tools and instruments in cognitive neuroscience.

10:00-10:45

Nikolaus Weiskopf

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

tba

10:45-11:15

Coffee Break

11:15-12:00

Maria Angela Franceschini

Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA

NIRS: Recent advances and future prospects

12:00-12:45

Vadim Nikulin

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

Neural Oscillations in EEG / MEG research

13:00-14:15

Lunch

Session 1: Tools and Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience: State of the art, recent advances, and future prospects, Part II

Chair: Arno Villringer

14:15-15:00

Alfred Anwander

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

tba

15:00-15:45

Til Ole Bergmann

Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.

tba

15:45-16:15

Coffee Break

16:15-17:00

Moritz Grosse Wentrup

Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Tuebingen, Germany.

tba

17:00-17:15

Arno Villringer

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

Conclusions

17:30-18:45

Poster Session I

19:00-21:30

Welcome Barbecue


WEDNESDAY, 27 JUNE

Session 2: Social Interaction

Chair: Stefanie Hoehl

09:30-10:15

Kristina Musholt

Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.

tba
10:15-11:00

Giacomo Rizzolatti

University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

11:30-12:15

Ruth Feldman

Bar Ilan University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

12:15-13:00

Daniel Haun

Leipzig University,Leipzig, Germany.

13:00-14:15

Lunch Break

Session 3: Aging

Chair: tba

14:30-15:15

Alexandra Freund

University of Zuerich, Zuerich, Switzerland.

15:15-16:00

Joseph Castellano

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.

16:00-16:30

Coffee Break

16:30-17:15

n.n.

17:30-18:45

Poster Session II


THURSDAY, 28 JUNE

Session 4: Modeling the mind

Chair: Thomas Knoesche

09:30-10:15

Biyu J. He

New York University, New York, USA.

tba

10:15-11:00

Uri Hasson

Princeton University, Princeton, USA.

tba

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

11:30-12:15

n.n.

12:15-13:30

Lunch

Session 5: Big Data and Neuroethics

Chair: Arno Villringer

13:30 - 14:00

Philipp Kellmayer

University of Freiburg, Germany.

tba

14:00-14:30

Paul Matthews

Imperial College Lonon, London, UK.

 

14:30-15:00

Danilo Bzdok

Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany.

The advent of big data in neuroscience: Implications for science and society

Neuroimaging datasets are constantly increasing in resolution, sample size, multi-modality, and meta-information complexity. This opens the brain imaging field to a more data-driven machine-learning regime (e.g., minibatch optimization, structured sparsity, deep learning), while analysis methods from the domain of classical statistics remain dominant (e.g., ANOVA, Pearson correlation, Student's t-test). Special interest may lie in the statistical learning of scalable generative models that explain brain function and structure. Instead of merely solving classification and regression tasks, they could explicitly capture properties of the data-generating neurobiological mechanisms. Python-implemented examples for such supervised and semisupervised machine-learning techniques will be provided as applications to the currently biggest neuroimaging dataset from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) data-collection initiative as well as the prospective epidemiological UK Biobank. The emphasis will be put on the feasability of deep neural networks and semisupervised architectures in imaging neuroscience. The successful extraction of structured knowledge from current and future large-scale neuroimaging datasets will be a critical prerequisite for our understanding of human brain organization in healthy populations and psychiatric/neurological disease, while raising new ethical concerns for our society.

15:00-15:30

Panel Discussion

15:30-16:00

Coffee Break

16:00-16:30

Feedback, Poster Prizes, and Final Remarks

 
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